Marketing

Marketing is a form of communication between you and your customers with the goal of selling your product or service to them. Communicating the value of your product or service is a key aspect of marketing.

Essentials

  • Essentials of Marketing
  • Essentials of B2B Marketing
  • Essentials of Marketing Research
  • Essentials of Social Media Marketing
  • Essentials of Branding and Measurement

Strategy

  • Content Marketing
  • Increasing Email Marketing Effectiveness
  • Influencer Marketing
  • Leading the Marketing Planning Initiative
  • Advanced Marketing Planning
  • Measuring Marketing ROI
  • Successfully Managing the Creative Process

Branding

  • Strategic Brand Development
  • Brand Storytelling

Customer Experience

  • Interpreting the Voice of Your Customer
  • Rethinking the Customer Experience

Sales & Marketing

  • Aligning Sales with Marketing

Digital

  • Digital Strategy and Analytics
  • Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
  • Marketing Automation
  • Social eCommerce

Data & Analytics

  • Winning with Analytics

Marcom

  • Effective Marketing Writing
  • Integrated Marketing Communications

The management process through which goods and services move from concept to the customer. It includes the coordination of four elements called the 4 P’s of marketing:

(1) identification, selection and development of a product,

(2) determination of its price,

(3) selection of a distribution channel to reach the customer’s place, and

(4) developement and implementation of a promotional strategy.

Marketing Concept

Management philosophy according to which a firm’s goals can be best achieved through identification and satisfaction of the customers‘ stated and unstated needs and wants.

131 different kinds of marketing

If ever you wanted evidence of just how sweeping and fragmented “marketing” is, try making a list of every kind of marketing out there. It starts simple enough, with search marketing, email marketing, product marketing, viral marketing — next thing you know, you have over a hundred terms!

Inspired by a conversation with my friend Mark Kapij, I decided to put together such a list.

To keep it somewhat manageable, I decided to only include terms that ended with the word marketing — any “                   marketing” phrase. So my apologies to advertising, branding, public relations, packaging, pricing, and all other such nomenclature. I also decided to leave out industry-specific terms such as real-estate marketing, healthcare marketing, political marketing, etc., as well as segments like Hispanic marketing and Millennial marketing.

I included anything that qualified as a tactic (“loyalty marketing”), a channel (“mobile marketing”), a style (“conversational marketing”), a structure (“corporate marketing”), or any other widely applicable aspect of marketing. I included some synonyms (INTERNET MARKETING” and “online marketing”), but not exhaustively so. For each phase, I added a brief description and a link to a resource or more detailed definition.

Do you have other phrases to nominate? Better descriptions or resources? Please add them in the comments.

account-based marketing — marketing to individual, key accounts as markets of one (Wikipedia)
affiliate marketing — paying affiliates to send traffic/customers to your website/business (Affiliate Scout)
agile marketing — using agile development methodologies in the marketing department (a manifesto)
algorithmic marketing — using software algorithms to execute (semi-)automated marketing (computational)
ambush marketing — piggybacking marketing on a major event without paying for sponsorship (WSJ article)
analytical marketing — quantitative methods and models of marketing (Carnegie Mellon program)
article marketing — writing articles (online and offline) to promote one’s business (Wikipedia)
B2B (business) marketing — marketing to other businesses (B2B Magazine)
B2C (consumer) marketing — marketing to consumers (B2C Marketing Insider)
B2P (person) marketing — marketing to persons, in business and life (New Marketing Labs post)
behavioral marketing — targeting advertising/offers based on user behavior (ClickZ column)
blackhat marketing — primarily in SEO, unethically fooling the search engines to game rank (About.com)
brand marketing — developing your brand, often contrasted to direct marketing (Best Brands 2010)
buzz marketing — getting people to talk about your stuff, similar to viral (Mark Hughes book)
call center marketing — outbound telemarketing and handling of inbound prospect/customer calls
campus marketing — marketing to (and often by) college students, campus ambassadors (Boston Globe)
catalog marketing — marketing through printed catalogs delivered in the mail (DIRECT article)
cause marketing — businesses marketing cooperatively with nonprofit(s) to mutual benefit (Alden Keene)
celebrity marketing — use of celebrities as spokespeople, for endorsements or testimonials (BSI post)
channel marketing — marketing promotions through wholesalers, distributers, resellers (definition)
closed loop marketing — measuring ROI from lifecycle of marketing to sales (Closed Loop Marketing blog)
cloud marketing — using software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications for marketing (CloudMarketing.org)
cooperative marketing — companies co-marketing a jointly developed product, service or brand (Wikipedia)
communal marketing — engaging the public in the development of a marketing campaign (Wikipedia)
community marketing — marketing by building an online community (Jeremiah Owyang’s blog)
(Green Marketing book)
guerilla marketing — low-budget, high-impact marketing, typically entrepreneurial (Jay Conrad Levison)
horizontal marketing — similar message across different groups/industries, in contrast to vertical marketing
inbound marketing — pulling in customers via content, instead of pushing ads or cold-calls (HubSpot)
industrial marketing — B2B marketing but specifically for large firms, esp. manufacturers (Wikipedia)
influence(r) marketing — focus on convincing a few influential people in a market (Influencer Marketing book)
informational marketing — providing useful/educational material to nurture audience, like content marketing
in-game marketing — in-game advertising, also known as advergaming, and in-game promotions (Wikipedia)
in-store marketing — promotions based at a retailer’s location (In-Store Marketing Institute)
integrated marketing — coordination and integration of multiple marketing tools, channels, vehicles (ClickZ)
interactive marketing — interactions between marketers and prospects, mostly online (Forrester blog)
INTERNET MARKETING — synonymous withONLINE MARKETING andWEB MARKETING(Wikipedia)
internal marketing — marketing to one’s own employees to synchronize customer experiences (Wikipedia)
international marketing — marketing overseas/across national borders, same as global marketing (Wikipedia)
keyword marketing — researching and optimizing keywords in search marketing (WordStream blog)
left-brain marketing — roughly synonymous with analytical marketing (Left Brain Marketing blog)
local marketing — ad targeting and promotions to support brick-and-mortar stores (WilsonWeb)
Long Tail marketing — marketing to many niche segments that aggregate to a huge audience (Wikipedia)
loyalty marketing — focus on growing and retaining existing customers, e.g., rewards programs (Wikipedia)
mobile marketing — marketing delivered via mobile devices such as (smart)phones (Mobile Marketer)
multichannel marketing — using multiple channels to reach customers (Multichannel Marketing Metrics)
multicultural marketing — pursuing ethnic audiences with products, advertising, experiences (The Book)
multi-level marketing — marketing by recruiting others, who recruit more; e.g., pyramid scheme (Wikipedia)
neuromarketing — the intersection of brain/cognitive science and marketing (Neuromarketing blog)
new media marketing — essentially synonymous withONLINE MARKETING, fading term (Wikipedia)
newsletter marketing — delivering regular newsletters to target audience via email or print (DIRECT article)
niche marketing — targeting very specific audience segments (Entrepreneur article)
non-traditional marketing — methods outside the norm, e.g., publicity stunts, guerrilla marketing (Inc. article)
offline marketing — all marketing that doesn’t happen online, traditional marketing (MarketingSherpa)
one-to-one marketing — marketing to individual consumers: identify, differentiate, interact, customize (book)
ONLINE MARKETING — marketing online, same as Internet orWEB MARKETING (Online Marketing Summit)

outbound marketing — contact prospects via ads, cold calls, list rental; opposite of inbound (BridgeGroup)
outdoor marketing — examples: door hangers, car advertising, billboards, balloons (eHow article)
out-of-home marketing — marketing to people in public places, e.g., outdoor marketing (Wikipedia)
performance marketing — marketing driven by performance metrics and ROI (Performance Insider)
permission marketing — inspiring your audience to want to hear from you (Seth Godin’s book)
personalized marketing — like one-to-one marketing, including product customization (Wikipedia)
persuasion marketing — derived from “persuasion architecture” for effectiveWEB MARKETING (the Eisenbergs)
point-of-sale marketing — advertising to customers at point of a purchase in a store (eHow article)
post-click marketing — user experience after an ad/email click, e.g., landing pages (ion’s blog)
PPC marketing — pay-per-click marketing on search engines, ad networks, social sites (PPC Hero)
product marketing — marketing around a particular product, versus corporate marketing (Wikipedia)
promotional marketing — broadly speaking, almost any kind of marketing to attract customers (PROMO)
proximity marketing — localized wireless distribution of advertising associated with a place (Wikipedia)
pull marketing — pushing messages to prospects, synonymous with inbound marketing (The Power of Pull)
push marketing — prospects pull messages from you, synonymous with outbound marketing (Wikipedia)
real-time marketing — accelerating marketing in the age of speed (David Meerman Scott book)
referral marketing — encouraging/incentivizing existing customers to refer new customers (Wikipedia)
relationship marketing — emphasis on building long-term relationships with customers (Regis McKenna)
remarketing — modern meaning: behaviorally-targeted advertising (Google Ad Innovations)
reply marketing — replying to end-users with personalized messages, e.g., Old Spice campaign (Wikipedia)
scientific marketing — application of analytical testing/statistical methods in marketing (Scientific Advertising)
search (engine) marketing — organic and paid promotion via Google, Bing, etc. (Search Engine Land)
self marketing — marketing yourself, also known as personal branding (U.S. News article)
services marketing — approaches for selling services instead of products (Delivering Quality Service)
shadow marketing — unexpected marketing outside the control of the marketing department (my post)
shopper marketing — understanding how consumer shop across channels and formats (Wikipedia)
social marketing — changing people’s behaviors for the better, not social media marketing (Squidoo)
social media marketing — interacting with prospects in social media channels (Social Media Insider)
sports marketing — use of sporting events, teams, and athletes to promote products (Wikipedia)
stealth marketing — ways of marketing surreptitiously to people, undercover marketing (HBR article)
street marketing — unconventional marketing in public places meant to engage prospects (Wikipedia)
technical marketing — marketing with technical depth to a technical audience (great post)
telemarketing — calling people on the phone with a pitch, usually uninvited (Wikipedia)
test-driven marketing — systematically and iteratively testing marketing ideas (Test-Driven Marketing)
time marketing — research on when to release and promote products in the market (Wikipedia)
trade show marketing — subset of event marketing, exhibiting and promoting at trade shows (TSNN)
traditional marketing — pre-Internet marketing methods and channels (MarketingProfs)
undercover marketing — when consumers don’t know they’re being steathily marketed to (Wikipedia)
user-generated marketing — marketing created by consumers, communal marketing (Disney campaign)
vertical marketing — packaging a solution differently for different industries (Wikipedia)
video marketing — incorporating videos in online marketing, leveraging YouTube (Pixability)
viral marketing — tapping into existing social networks to spread a marketing idea (Wikipedia)
WEB MARKETING — marketing on the web, synonymous with online marketing (Web Marketing Today)
word-of-mouth marketing — when happy customers spread your marketing message (WOMMA)
youth marketing — targeting young audiences, often using emerging channels (Wikipedia)

Marketing is a strategy used by companies to communicate with the consumer and make him knowledgeable about the various features of their products and services. It is an essential part of attracting the target buyers to a particular product, and companies use various innovative or tried-and-tested techniques to stay ahead of their competitors and make their place in the market.

Here are some of the most popular and effective types of marketing:

I included anything that qualified as a tactic (“loyalty marketing”), a channel (“mobile marketing”), a style (“conversational marketing”), a structure (“corporate marketing”), or any other widely applicable aspect of marketing. I included some synonyms (INTERNET MARKETING” and “online marketing”), but not exhaustively so. For each phase, I added a brief description and a link to a resource or more detailed definition.

Do you have other phrases to nominate? Better descriptions or resources? Please add them in the comments.

account-based marketing — marketing to individual, key accounts as markets of one (Wikipedia)
affiliate marketing — paying affiliates to send traffic/customers to your website/business (Affiliate Scout)
agile marketing — using agile development methodologies in the marketing department (a manifesto)
algorithmic marketing — using software algorithms to execute (semi-)automated marketing (computational)
ambush marketing — piggybacking marketing on a major event without paying for sponsorship (WSJ article)
analytical marketing — quantitative methods and models of marketing (Carnegie Mellon program)
article marketing — writing articles (online and offline) to promote one’s business (Wikipedia)
B2B (business) marketing — marketing to other businesses (B2B Magazine)
B2C (consumer) marketing — marketing to consumers (B2C Marketing Insider)
B2P (person) marketing — marketing to persons, in business and life (New Marketing Labs post)
behavioral marketing — targeting advertising/offers based on user behavior (ClickZ column)
blackhat marketing — primarily in SEO, unethically fooling the search engines to game rank (About.com)
brand marketing — developing your brand, often contrasted to direct marketing (Best Brands 2010)
buzz marketing — getting people to talk about your stuff, similar to viral (Mark Hughes book)
call center marketing — outbound telemarketing and handling of inbound prospect/customer calls
campus marketing — marketing to (and often by) college students, campus ambassadors (Boston Globe)
catalog marketing — marketing through printed catalogs delivered in the mail (DIRECT article)
cause marketing — businesses marketing cooperatively with nonprofit(s) to mutual benefit (Alden Keene)
celebrity marketing — use of celebrities as spokespeople, for endorsements or testimonials (BSI post)
channel marketing — marketing promotions through wholesalers, distributers, resellers (definition)
closed loop marketing — measuring ROI from lifecycle of marketing to sales (Closed Loop Marketing blog)
cloud marketing — using software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications for marketing (CloudMarketing.org)
cooperative marketing — companies co-marketing a jointly developed product, service or brand (Wikipedia)
communal marketing — engaging the public in the development of a marketing campaign (Wikipedia)
community marketing — marketing by building an online community (Jeremiah Owyang’s blog)
(Green Marketing book)
guerilla marketing — low-budget, high-impact marketing, typically entrepreneurial (Jay Conrad Levison)
horizontal marketing — similar message across different groups/industries, in contrast to vertical marketing
inbound marketing — pulling in customers via content, instead of pushing ads or cold-calls (HubSpot)
industrial marketing — B2B marketing but specifically for large firms, esp. manufacturers (Wikipedia)
influence(r) marketing — focus on convincing a few influential people in a market (Influencer Marketing book)
informational marketing — providing useful/educational material to nurture audience, like content marketing
in-game marketing — in-game advertising, also known as advergaming, and in-game promotions (Wikipedia)
in-store marketing — promotions based at a retailer’s location (In-Store Marketing Institute)
integrated marketing — coordination and integration of multiple marketing tools, channels, vehicles (ClickZ)
interactive marketing — interactions between marketers and prospects, mostly online (Forrester blog)
INTERNET MARKETING — synonymous withONLINE MARKETING andWEB MARKETING(Wikipedia)
internal marketing — marketing to one’s own employees to synchronize customer experiences (Wikipedia)
international marketing — marketing overseas/across national borders, same as global marketing (Wikipedia)
keyword marketing — researching and optimizing keywords in search marketing (WordStream blog)
left-brain marketing — roughly synonymous with analytical marketing (Left Brain Marketing blog)
local marketing — ad targeting and promotions to support brick-and-mortar stores (WilsonWeb)
Long Tail marketing — marketing to many niche segments that aggregate to a huge audience (Wikipedia)
loyalty marketing — focus on growing and retaining existing customers, e.g., rewards programs (Wikipedia)
mobile marketing — marketing delivered via mobile devices such as (smart)phones (Mobile Marketer)
multichannel marketing — using multiple channels to reach customers (Multichannel Marketing Metrics)
multicultural marketing — pursuing ethnic audiences with products, advertising, experiences (The Book)
multi-level marketing — marketing by recruiting others, who recruit more; e.g., pyramid scheme (Wikipedia)
neuromarketing — the intersection of brain/cognitive science and marketing (Neuromarketing blog)
new media marketing — essentially synonymous withONLINE MARKETING, fading term (Wikipedia)
newsletter marketing — delivering regular newsletters to target audience via email or print (DIRECT article)
niche marketing — targeting very specific audience segments (Entrepreneur article)
non-traditional marketing — methods outside the norm, e.g., publicity stunts, guerrilla marketing (Inc. article)
offline marketing — all marketing that doesn’t happen online, traditional marketing (MarketingSherpa)
one-to-one marketing — marketing to individual consumers: identify, differentiate, interact, customize (book)
ONLINE MARKETING — marketing online, same as Internet orWEB MARKETING (Online Marketing Summit)

outbound marketing — contact prospects via ads, cold calls, list rental; opposite of inbound (BridgeGroup)
outdoor marketing — examples: door hangers, car advertising, billboards, balloons (eHow article)
out-of-home marketing — marketing to people in public places, e.g., outdoor marketing (Wikipedia)
performance marketing — marketing driven by performance metrics and ROI (Performance Insider)
permission marketing — inspiring your audience to want to hear from you (Seth Godin’s book)
personalized marketing — like one-to-one marketing, including product customization (Wikipedia)
persuasion marketing — derived from “persuasion architecture” for effectiveWEB MARKETING (the Eisenbergs)
point-of-sale marketing — advertising to customers at point of a purchase in a store (eHow article)
post-click marketing — user experience after an ad/email click, e.g., landing pages (ion’s blog)
PPC marketing — pay-per-click marketing on search engines, ad networks, social sites (PPC Hero)
product marketing — marketing around a particular product, versus corporate marketing (Wikipedia)
promotional marketing — broadly speaking, almost any kind of marketing to attract customers (PROMO)
proximity marketing — localized wireless distribution of advertising associated with a place (Wikipedia)
pull marketing — pushing messages to prospects, synonymous with inbound marketing (The Power of Pull)
push marketing — prospects pull messages from you, synonymous with outbound marketing (Wikipedia)
real-time marketing — accelerating marketing in the age of speed (David Meerman Scott book)
referral marketing — encouraging/incentivizing existing customers to refer new customers (Wikipedia)
relationship marketing — emphasis on building long-term relationships with customers (Regis McKenna)
remarketing — modern meaning: behaviorally-targeted advertising (Google Ad Innovations)
reply marketing — replying to end-users with personalized messages, e.g., Old Spice campaign (Wikipedia)
scientific marketing — application of analytical testing/statistical methods in marketing (Scientific Advertising)
search (engine) marketing — organic and paid promotion via Google, Bing, etc. (Search Engine Land)
self marketing — marketing yourself, also known as personal branding (U.S. News article)
services marketing — approaches for selling services instead of products (Delivering Quality Service)
shadow marketing — unexpected marketing outside the control of the marketing department (my post)
shopper marketing — understanding how consumer shop across channels and formats (Wikipedia)
social marketing — changing people’s behaviors for the better, not social media marketing (Squidoo)
social media marketing — interacting with prospects in social media channels (Social Media Insider)
sports marketing — use of sporting events, teams, and athletes to promote products (Wikipedia)
stealth marketing — ways of marketing surreptitiously to people, undercover marketing (HBR article)
street marketing — unconventional marketing in public places meant to engage prospects (Wikipedia)
technical marketing — marketing with technical depth to a technical audience (great post)
telemarketing — calling people on the phone with a pitch, usually uninvited (Wikipedia)
test-driven marketing — systematically and iteratively testing marketing ideas (Test-Driven Marketing)
time marketing — research on when to release and promote products in the market (Wikipedia)
trade show marketing — subset of event marketing, exhibiting and promoting at trade shows (TSNN)
traditional marketing — pre-Internet marketing methods and channels (MarketingProfs)
undercover marketing — when consumers don’t know they’re being steathily marketed to (Wikipedia)
user-generated marketing — marketing created by consumers, communal marketing (Disney campaign)
vertical marketing — packaging a solution differently for different industries (Wikipedia)
video marketing — incorporating videos in online marketing, leveraging YouTube (Pixability)
viral marketing — tapping into existing social networks to spread a marketing idea (Wikipedia)
WEB MARKETING — marketing on the web, synonymous with online marketing (Web Marketing Today)
word-of-mouth marketing — when happy customers spread your marketing message (WOMMA)
youth marketing — targeting young audiences, often using emerging channels (Wikipedia

Marketing is a strategy used by companies to communicate with the consumer and make him knowledgeable about the various features of their products and services. It is an essential part of attracting the target buyers to a particular product, and companies use various innovative or tried-and-tested techniques to stay ahead of their competitors and make their place in the market.

Affinity Marketing –  Also known as Partnership Marketing, this technique links complementary brands, thereby creating strategic partnerships that benefit both companies. While one adds value to existing customers by generating more income, the other builds new customer relationships.

Alliance Marketing – Here two or more entities come together to pool in their resources to promote and sell a product or service, which will not only benefit their stakeholders, but also have a greater impact on the market.

Ambush Marketing – This strategy is used by advertisers to capitalize on and associated themselves with a specific event without the payment of any sponsorship fee, thereby bringing down the value of sponsorship. It has sub-categories like direct or predatory ambushing or indirect ambushing by association, to name a few.

Call to Action (CTA) Marketing – CTA is a part of inbound marketing used on websites in the form of a banner, text or graphic, where it is meant to prompt a person to click it and move into the conversion funnel, that is, from searching to navigating an online store to converting to a sale.

Close Range Marketing (CRM) – Also known as Proximity Marketing, CRM uses bluetooth technology or Wifi to promote their products and services to their customers at close proximity.

Cloud Marketing – This refers to the type of marketing that takes place on the internet, where all the marketing resources and assets are transferred online so that the respective parties can develop, modify, utilise and share them.

Community Marketing – This technique caters to the needs and requirements of the existing customers, as opposed to using resources to gather new consumers. This promotes loyalty and product satisfaction and also gives rise to word of mouth marketing among the community.

Content Marketing – In this case, content is created and published on various platforms to give information about a certain product or service to potential customers and to influence them, without making a direct sales pitch.

Cross-media Marketing – As the name suggests, multiple channels like emails, letters, web pages etc are used to give information about products and services to customers in the form of cross promotion.

Database Marketing – This utilizes and information from database of customers or potential consumers to create customised communication strategies through any media in order to promote products and services.

Digital Marketing – This strategy uses various digital devices like smartphones, computers, tablets or digital billboards to inform customers and business partners about its products.INTERNET MARKETING is a key element in Digital Marketing.

Direct Marketing – This is a wide term which refers to the technique where organizations communicate directly with the consumer through mail, email, texts, fliers and various promotional materials.

Diversity Marketing – The aim of this strategy is to take into account the different diversities in a culture in terms of beliefs, expectations, tastes and needs and then create a customized marketing plan to target those consumers effectively.

Evangelism Marketing – It is similar to word-of-mouth marketing, where a company develops customers who become voluntary advocates of a product and who promote its features and benefits on behalf of the company.

Freebie Marketing – Here a particular item is sold at low rates, or is given away free, to boost the sales of another complimentary item or service.

Free Sample Marketing – Unlike Freebie Marketing, this is not dependent on complimentary marketing, but rather consists of giving away a free sample of the product to influence the consumer to make the purchase.

Guerrilla Marketing – Unconventional and inexpensive techniques with imagination, big crowds and a surprise element are used for marketing something, a popular example being flash mobs.

By keeping in mind the distinctive features of the product, the demographics of the target consumer and their spending power, and the current strategies of existing companies, an effective marketing strategy may be successfully created.

7 Steps to the Perfect Marketing Plan

One of the most powerful strategic planning tools your business can possess is a marketing plan. I’m not referring to an academic exercise found in college marketing textbooks. Your marketing plan should be a simple (in some cases, one-page) document that specifically answers who you are, what you do, who needs what you do and how you plan to attract their attention. It’s a combination of the planning process and the completed action plan.

Follow these seven simple steps to build the perfect marketing plan:

Step 1: Narrow your market focus. Try to describe your ideal customer in the narrowest and most detailed terms possible, as though you’re describing him or her to a referral source

Step 2: Position your business. Figure out what you do best and what your target market wants. Maybe it’s how you serve a niche or package your products. If you don’t know what it is, call up three or four of your clients and ask them why they buy from you. Craft a core marketing message that allows you to quickly differentiate your business.

Step 3: Create education-based marketing materials. Recreate all your marketing materials, including your website, to focus on education. Make certain every word in your marketing materials speaks of your core messages and to your target market.

Step 4: Never cold call. Make sure all your advertising is geared toward creating prospects, not customers. You must find ways to educate before you sell. Your target market needs to learn how you provide value in a way that makes them want to pay a premium for your services or products. You simply can’t do this in a 3-inch-by-4-inch ad. Your ad must get viewers to ask for more information. Then you can proceed to selling. Determine all the ways you can get your education-based messages in front of your narrowly defined target market.

Step 5: Earn media attention. Create a list of journalists who cover your industry or community, and build relationships with each by becoming a reliable resource of information. Plan out an entire year of new items you can promote by season or event.

Step 6: Expect referrals. Create a referral marketing engine that systematically turns each client and referral network into a kind of unpaid sales pro. You must instill a referral marketing mind-set into your business’s culture. Do this by making every customer a marketing and referral contact. Map every contact and build processes that focus on referrals.

Step 7: Live by a calendar. After you complete steps 1 through 6, determine what you need to do to put them into action. Then create an annual marketing calendar, noting the required monthly, weekly and daily appointments necessary to move your plan forward.

The 10 Rules of Modern Marketing: Creating “Customer Love” in The Digital Age.

Customers have become the central focus of modern marketing, so brands need to create digital experiences that appeal to the consumer in a personal yet persuasive way. While every brand is different, there are some universal rules to making marketing strategies convey a sense of personal fulfillment and create customer desire. Boston.com outlined these 10 tenets of modern marketing in the digital age that let customers know you care.

  1. Marketing Differs from Advertising– While advertising is usually the one-way expression of a message, marketing is the two-way dialogue between the company and the consumer. Now more than ever, marketing is about building relationships and connecting to the customer on a personal level. Show consumers that you want to interact with them and they will reward you with their engagement and enthusiasm.
  2. Fifth “P” of Marketing is Participation– The interactivity of our world has empowered consumers to get involved with the brands they value. Let consumers know that their opinions matter by allowing them to participate in the development of the brand. This will give them a sense of ownership in the brand and ultimately increase their loyalty and advocacy.
  3. Listening is Vital– The Internet has made it easier than ever to hear what customers are saying and sharing about a brand, so pay attention to their conversations throughout online review sites, social media networks, community message boards, and other digital forums. Listen closely to learn a lot about how the brand is perceived and ways it can be improved.
  4. Talk is Free Publicity– Encourage customers to share their experiences and spread the good word about your brand. Personal recommendations are one of the most trusted and influential forms of marketing, in addition to being free of charge yet full of benefits.
  5. Focus on “Me-Commerce” Rather Than E-Commerce– Give generalONLINE MARKETINGefforts a more personalized tone to make customers feel like they’re having a one-on-one experience with the company. From customizing products to offering personalized customer service, this shift in sales approach will make customers feel personally valued by the brand and is likely to lead to higher sales.
  6. Mobile Marketing is a Must– The ubiquity of mobile devices has redefined marketing today and made it easier than ever for brands to connect with consumers at any place and any time. Take advantage of mobile technology by developingmobile marketing campaigns and websites for smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices so consumers can experience the brand on-the go.
  1. Content is KeyDevelop content that is relevant to the brand and the ways that customers use it. Keep the content fresh, original, and interesting in order to maximize engagement and increase the likelihood that customers will share it with their social media networks.
  2. Encourage Employees to Be Brand Managers– Every person in an organization is a representation of the brand, so make sure that they are all knowledgeable about its benefits and features. More importantly, each of these people must also treat customers in a friendly, respectful way since their behavior is also a direct reflection upon the brand. With the power of social media, a customer’s negative experience with an employee can have endless repercussions.
  3. Take Advantage of Technology– Today’s technology makes it simple to monitor and measure brand performance to show a company which approaches are working and which could use some work. Seek out the latest high-tech tools and techniques in order to enhance the user experience and maximize the effectiveness of digital marketing strategies.
  4. Be Choosy About Channels– The ever-expanding variety of online platforms makes it tempting for a brand to appear on every single site, but this is a waste of valuable resources. Instead, consider how the channel fits into the lives of the target audience and only pursue online platforms that appeal to the brand’s customer base and are relevant to the brand itself.

The 10 Essential Tips for B2B Marketing Success in a Digital Economy

Being Found

1. The website: Your digital kingdom.

Most companies know they need to have a website but don’t recognize just how critical it is. Your website is your digital kingdom, a place where you can share your brand story, connect people directly to your company and make that all-important first impression. Make sure you online presence is up to par by having an engaging customer experience, top-notch branding and easy navigation.

2. Content: What’s your story?

Most companies do a great job of explaining what they do but fail when it comes to using more dynamic content (blogs, videos, infographics) to show how they can help. Customers respond to relevant information and education, products and services come later. If you haven’t already, begin telling your story in various formats. The more often you tell, the more likely your story will be heard.

3. Search basics: What SMBs really need to know about search.

Being found through search — via search engine optimization (SEO) — requires a regular stream of high-quality and relevant content, as well as social media to boost authority and visibility. Social media often gets pushed to the side but according to this study

seven of the top eight SEO factors are tied directly to social activity. So, get social! But keep in mind, you need to be on these social-media channels on a regular basis, otherwise, you will lose your customers’ interest.

4. Social listening: Figuring out your audience online.

Strategic social media use starts by listening to your competitors as much as your audience, so you have a complete view of what’s going on in your industry. Watch what industry players and influencers say and do online, and pay attention to the tactics that engage thought leaders, competitors and consumers. A great place to keep tabs on your competition is their blog. See what they are talking about, what their customers are saying and what pain points are occurring.

Being Seen

5. Social media: Connecting your ideas with the world.

There may be no better way to connect your ideas with the world than through social media. It can be a terrific way to boost your company’s visibility online. One of our strongest recommendations is to  focus on sharing highly useful and targeted content that’s of interest to the people you want to connect with.

6. Paid media: Placing content in the right spots.

For potentially just a few dollars a day, paid advertising on platforms like AdWords along with social-media ads can have their place. If you narrow your focus to a very specific keyword or phrase that your typical client is looking for, an ad that sends them to a strategic landing page can be well worth the investment. If you have no clue what keywords your target demographic is searching for, Google provides information on this through its AdWords platform.

7. Upcycling content: Increase visibility and your reach.

Content is often written, shared and quickly forgotten. Upcycling is a trend to reuse and rebuild previously published information to extend shelf life and boost visibility. For example, you can take a blog post you wrote six months ago and expand it in these ways:

  • Create a Slideshare
  • Recap the article in a video and post it to YouTube
  • Republish the article on LinkedIn
  • Build an infographic for more visual viewers
  • Expand it into a white paper
  • Syndicate the content to industry trade publications

8. Social selling: Moving consumers through the funnel.

While social selling allows salespeople to use social channels to share company’s content directly with potential or current customers, it must be better than spam. There has to be context for the information being shared, and the focus should be on starting a discussion, not pushing for a sale.

Related: 5 Factors Breaking Your B2B Content Marketing 

Being Heard

9. Build commitment: Like, follow, subscribe.

The path doesn’t end when someone finds your company online — your efforts are wasted if someone shows up then leaves. Build commitment by making it easy to stay in touch.

  1. Make social links easy to spot, so people can Like, Follow or share your content.
  2. Create a simple email subscription form for newsletter or blog post distribution.
  3. Don’t forget to link to your RSS feed — some people prefer it.
  4. For rich content like white papers or eBooks, consider gated content — a tactic that exchanges basic information for a download. It can help you generate leads and measure your investment, but use it sparingly.

10. Online engagement: A one-to-one conversation.

Digital marketing is about driving a better customer experience, earning sales and retention by focusing on the importance of one-to-one marketing. Your end goal is to start and continue discussions that lead to new brand advocates, new customers and long-term clients that ultimately become referral generators.

Competing in the digital economy can seem overwhelming, but in many ways the web levels the playing field. After all, the best content doesn’t cost the most, rather it makes the most effective connection with the reader. By focusing on the essentials of being found, seen and heard online, it’s possible to not only succeed in the digital economy, but to relish in growth and visibility.